Gulf Coast fishing: Bainbridge men catch two large mahi mahi




CLICK TO ENLARGE Tripp Powell (left) and Skylar Smith (right) pose with two mahi mahi they caught off the coast of Panama City, Fla., on June 7. Both men are from Bainbridge, Ga.
CLICK TO ENLARGE Tripp Powell (left) and Skylar Smith (right) pose with two mahi mahi they caught off the coast of Panama City, Fla., on June 7. Both men are from Bainbridge, Ga.
CLICK TO ENLARGE
Tripp Powell (left) and Skylar Smith (right) pose with two mahi mahi they caught off the coast of Panama City, Fla., on June 7. Both men are from Bainbridge, Ga.

The two Mahi Mahi dolphin fish that are in the photo were caught in the Gulf of Mexico, about 25 miles off Panama City Beach, Fla., during federal snapper season on June 7, 2015.

Skylar Smith (at right) caught the Bull (Male) and Tripp Powell (left) caught the Cow (female).

“Both guys hooked up with the dolphins at the exact same time on Tripp Powell’s boat,” said Jenna Jeter Smith, who was on the trip. “We were there to catch Red Snapper and luckily hooked up with these two dolphins.”

Send your fishing photos to brennan@live1019.com and we’ll feature them on sowegalive.com!

Jenna explained, “Mahi mahi are known for their beautiful colors and their delicious taste. When the fish is out of the water for a certain amount of time, it begins to lose its blue/green/yellow coloring and becomes a silver color.”

Is mahi-mahi a dolphin?

Yes and no. A mahi-mahi is a dolphinfish. On the east coast they are called ‘dolphin’ or ‘rakingo’ on the west coast they are called ‘dorado’. The confusion arises from calling porpoises, which are mammals not fish, by the name ‘dolphin’ – such as the bottle-nosed dolphin. If you see ‘dolphin’ on a menu, then it is certainly mahi-mahi or ‘dolphin’ the fish. The mammals are highly protected.




Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*