Late night search for prowler leads officers to make meth arrest




libby_street_map
Libby Street is marked by the red pin on this map.

Bainbridge Public Safety officers who responded to a 911 call about a suspected prowler ended up arresting a local man on drug-related charges.

Residents of a Libby Street residence, in a neighborhood behind Memorial Hospital in Bainbridge, called 911 at 1:45 a.m. Sunday to report they had heard someone knocking at their back door trying to get in their house.

Officer Jason Barlow searched the area but was unable to locate anyone. At around 2 a.m., one of the Libby Street residents called back 911 and reported he had seen a male running from behind his apartment toward Pine Street. Officer Barlow searched the area again but could not find the prowler.

At 5:33 a.m., Barlow received word from 911 that someone had actually broken into the Libby Street residence before running back outside. The 911 caller said there had been two subjects trying to get into the house. The caller said one of the prowlers was wearing a mask and holding a flashlight in his hands. The female resident also thought she recognized another of the suspects. One of the suspects left running south on College Street and another ran north toward Mitchell Street.

Canvassing the neighborhood, Public Safety Officer Humberto Dean located a white male later identified as Jason Guy Sapp. Sapp was wearing different clothing from what the 911 caller had described about the suspect she thought she recognized. However, Sapp–who said he was walking to his home two streets over after shopping at Wal-Mart–was taken into custody and searched.

In Sapp’s backpack, Public Safety officers found:

  • Two flashlights
  • A hunting mask
  • An open pocket knife
  • A black cloth bag containing four syringes, a plastic spoon, a small zipper bag containing meth and a small plastic baggy containing meth

Jason Guy Sapp, 32, of 1651 Mitchell Street, Bainbridge, was charged by BPS with possession of methamphetamine, loitering and possession of drug-related objects.

 




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